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How to Sell Your Toy or Action Figure Collection (with Value Guides)

Updated: Sep 20

So you've been collecting toys for a few years and are finally ready to cash out. Or maybe you've inherited a toy, and/or action figure collection and are looking to sell your collection as a whole. If you need advice on what steps to take next, then you've come to the right place. Here, we've provided a complete guide on what steps you need to take when selling your action figure collection. We've also provided information on the most valuable toys as well as other useful tidbits for some of the most popular toy lines. We've also provided a toy grading guide and plenty of helpful beginner's tips when selling your toy collection on places like eBay.


When starting you need to first look at the age of your toy collection. Are they mostly from the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, or 2000s? If the toy collection you're looking to sell is mostly from the 1980s or earlier, then you're probably in luck as there's a good chance that you at least have something of value. If you have a collection from the 1990s, then you need to look for specific toy lines (Powers Rangers, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, WWF Hasbro, etc) to find value. If you have action figures from the 2000s and up, then some will most likely have value, but it will depend on the toy line and specific items(s) to determine the actual worth.



While action figures and toys can be great collectibles, they don't always appreciate like other collectibles (ex: cards, comics). If you're looking to sell a collection of toys, then we have one important piece of advice to start with: keep your expectations low. This is very important because you don't want to look up incorrect prices online and expect thousands of dollars for a collection worth a fraction of that. Doing this will make your expectations grow sky-high and make it very difficult to sell the collection. If you start with low expectations, then you'll have a much easier time selling everything (and be satisfied if you get more than you initially thought). Also, be sure to lose any kind of attachment you have to the collection. We find selling the first few pieces to be the most difficult, but once you start, it will become much easier.


This guide starts with lists of some of the most valuable toys and action figures from each specific line and decade. It also provides some general information about the value of each toy line and how much demand there is for those particular toys today. Note that a sealed toy or action figure will sell for much more than an opened one. Opened toys will usually sell for a fraction of the price when compared to a sealed one (especially when you're looking at something vintage). A toy that is missing the accessories, will sell for even less. You also need to consider the condition of the package if the toy is sealed.


Note that this toy and action figure guide is for entertainment purposes only. You're welcome to sell your toys for whatever price you'd like. We also shouldn't be your sole means of research. You should always be thorough and do proper research before selling an entire collection of toys or action figures. If you want any personal opinions (for entertainment purposes only), then be sure to call, text, or email us, and we can provide any advice personalized you might need, free of charge.


If you ever want to cut out the hassle that comes with selling your toy collection online, then be sure to call, text, or email us. We pay cash for toy collections and pay fair prices. We also travel to you to make life easier.


That being said, let's work our way through the decades and outline some of the more popular toys in that period.



 

If You Have a Collection of 1900-1970s Toys You're Looking to Sell


Some toys from the early 1900s (Pre-WWII) were not as widely produced and took more time to make (very different from today). That made toys more expensive and something that most could not afford (especially during the Depression Era). This, along with the fact that no one saved their old toys, makes most pre-war toys worth much more. Things would start changing in the 1950s thru the 1970s when we saw toy manufacturing change, making toys cheaper to own. Add that to the fact that the American economy took a turn for the better, and you have a recipe for more widely purchased toys.


Generally speaking, many toys from the 1900s thru the 1970s have some kind of value, as long as they are original and in acceptable condition. A lot of pre-war toys don't need a box to be worth something, but toys from the 1950s and up usually benefit greatly from having a box. Just be sure that you have original toys and not reproductions as they can be quite common (check the markings, aging, and tooling). Be sure to contact us if you need us to check any of your items for authenticity.


 

Tin, Steel, or Wind Up Toys from the early part of the 1900s can be as valuable as they come when it comes to vintage toys. Some toys can sell for thousands of dollars, even if the condition isn't great. Anything produced in the latter part of the 1800s can sell for even more money, as they are incredibly rare. Note that while we only list a few of the most valuable toys here, there are still plenty more worth big bucks.


Some of the most valuable tin, steel, or wind-up toys include:


Mickey and Minnie Mouse Wind Up Toy (Gurdy, 1930)

Ulysses Grant Smoking Toy (Very Rare, Ives, 1880)

Sojourner Truth Mechanical Clockwork Toy (Very Rare, Ives, 1884)

Buddy L Pressed Steel Wrecking Truck Toy (Quality Toys)

Delage Tin-Plate Wind-Up Toy (JEP France 1920)

Pressed Steel Oil Tanker Truck (Studitoy)

Popeye Cast Iron Motorcycle Toy (Hubley, 1929)

The Bell Ringers Pull Toy (Gong Bell Company)



 

Board Games for the most part aren't generally valuable unless you have something very early (usually pre-war). Even if sealed and old, they probably won't be worth much unless the content is something collectors look for (ex: the Munsters). It can also be tough to find any open board games that are complete with all parts included. If you're missing any pieces from the game, then the price will drop even more. Note that there are some early board games (ex: Game of Baseball) from the late 1800s to early 1900s that are very tough to come across and if you have any of those, then you're looking at some good money.


Some of the most valuable vintage board games include:


Melvin Purvis' G-Men (Parker Brothers 1935)

Game of Baseball (McLoughlin, 1886, Rare)

The Munsters Picnic Board Game (1965, Sealed)

Buffalo Bill Game (Parker Brothers, 1898)

Tarzan Board Game (Parker Brothers, 1939)


 

GI Joe action figures from the 1960s and 1970s (produced by Hasbro) generally have more value if they are complete in the box. If they're missing the box and/or accessories, then the value will drop substantially. While they generally aren't as popular as the 1980s smaller-scale GI Joe action figures, there is still a collectors market for the earlier GI Joe action figures. If you have something hard to find and complete with the original box, then you can easily sell it for good money.


Some of the most valuable vintage GI Joe action figures from the 60s and 70s include:


GI Joe Nurse (Complete w/Box)

GI Joe Deep Sea Diver (1967, Complete w/Box)

GI Joe Action Soldier (1960s, Fold Top Box)

GI Joe Action Sailor (1964, Complete w/Box)

GI Joe African American Action Figure (Complete w/Box)

GI Joe Shore Patrol Set (1967, Complete w/Box)

GI Joe Astronaut (1970, Complete w/Box)



 

Mattel Barbie dolls from the 1950s and 1960s are generally valuable, especially if they are complete in the original box. Some of the dolls from countries such as Japan and Germany can be very tough to find and have a fair amount of appeal and demand among collectors. The very early editions of this popular Mattel doll line can also sell for thousands. Again, condition and box add to the value of older toys and dolls.


Some of the most valuable Barbie dolls from the 50s, 60s, and 70s include:


Brunette #1 Barbie Doll (1959, Complete w/Box)

Brunette Ponytail #1 Barbie Doll (1959, Complete w/Box)

Brunette Ponytail #1 Barbie Doll (1959, Complete w/Box)

Bild Lili Hauser Barbie (1950s, German)

Debutante Ball Ensemble Barbie (1958, Japan)


 

Superhero Toys from the 1940s thru the 1960s are worth a good amount, especially if they are complete and in working condition. Some early Superman and Batman toys can sell for hundreds (or thousands) of dollars, regardless of condition. Superman tin toys can be some of the harder-to-find toys from this category, but Batman TV show toys from the 1960s can also be tough to find complete in their box. There is also a fairly large demand for Batman toys from the 60s, due to the popularity of the classic TV show.


Some of the most valuable superhero action figures from the 1940s thru the 1970s include:


Superman Tin Toy (1940, Marx)

Superman Wooden Doll (1940, Ideal)

Superman w/Tank Tin Toy (Multiple Colors and Dates, Line-Mar, Marx)

Superman Fighting Tank Toy (1958, Linemar, Complete w/Box)

Super Queens Posin' Batgirl Doll (1967, Complete w/Box)

Batman Utility Belt (1966, Ideal, Complete w/Box)

Batman and Robin Hand Puppets (1966, Ideal, Complete w/Box)

Batman Flying Batplane (1966, Remco, Complete w/Box)

Superman Krypto Raygun (Daisy, 1940, Complete w/Box)

Batman Mask and Cape (1967, Ideal, Complete w/Box)


 

Lionel Trains (and other related trains) have waning interest over the years and the demand for them doesn't seem to be increasing. If you have Lionel trains, then it will depend on what you specifically have for the collection to have value. The very early pre-war sets from the 1930s can sell for thousands of dollars. Putting them together can be very difficult, but it will make selling much easier if you have complete train sets. We recommend selling Lionel Trains in sets or lots if you have newer, more common pieces.


Some of the most valuable vintage Lionel trains include:


Lionel Steamer Locomotive/Tender No 390E (Standard Gauge)

Lionel Hudson Steam Locomotive 763E

Lionel Hudson Type 5340 Locomotive

Lionel Mickey Mouse Hand Car Toy (1935)

Lionel Mickey Mouse Circus Train Set (Pre-War)

Lionel 228 Switcher w/2228B Slopeback


 

Aurora Models from the 1960s can be generally tough to find unassembled and in their original boxes. Some of the more popular characters can sell for hundreds (or thousands) online. They don't go up for sale too often, so when they do they can catch the attention of model collectors as well as fans of Marvel or TV/Film monsters.


Some of the most valuable models from the 1960s include:


Frankenstein (Aurora, 1964, Complete w/Box)

Amazing Spider-Man (Aurora, 1966, Complete w/Box)

The Munsters Living Room (Aurora, 1964, Complete w/Box)

The Adams Family Haunted House (Aurora, 1964, Complete w/Box)

Creature from the Black Lagoon (Aurora, 1965, Complete w/Box)

Dracula (Aurora, 1962, Complete w/Box)

Incredible Hulk (Aurora, 1966, Complete w/Box)


Aurora Spider-Man Model

 

Matchbox and Hot Wheels from the 1960s and 1970s have their loyal following. Finding some of the early cars sealed in their original packages can be tough. Some of the early playsets can sell for good money online as well. If you have opened/loose die-cast cars from the 60s and 70s, then the value will depend on the demand of that specific piece. Many times it's just easier to sell loose Hot Wheels and Matchbox cars in lots, even if they're older.

Some of the most valuable Hot Wheels and Matchbox cars from the 1960s and 1970s:


Redline Yellow Olds 442 (1969, Hot Wheels, Sealed)

Custom Camaro Redline Metallic Purple, Dark Interior (1967, Hot Wheels, Sealed)

Redline Cougar Orange, White Interior (1969, Hot Wheels, Sealed)

Superfine Turbine (1971, Hot Wheels, Sealed)

Sand Witch (1971, Hot Wheels, Sealed)

Hiway Robber (1971, Hot Wheels, Sealed)

Superfast Cattle Truck #37 (Matchbox, 1969, Sealed)

Police Patrol Car #55 (Matchbox, Complete w/Box)

York Freightmaster Trailer #2 (Matchbox, Complete w/Box)

Ferrari Berlinetta #75 (Matchbox, Complete w/Box)

Mark Ten Jaguar #32 (Matchbox, Complete w/Box)

Vauxhall Cresta, Light Pink and Turquoise (Matchbox, 1969, Sealed)


 

MEGO toys from the 1970s all have at least some value as long as they're complete with accessories (sometimes even if they aren't). There generally seems to be more of a demand for comic book characters, however. Sealed MEGO toys are usually worth hundreds while value drops considerably if they've been opened. Note that there are also some MEGO bootlegs (pictured below) that were released in the 1970s, and while they can be tough to sell, there is still a small collectors market for them.


Some of the most valuable MEGO action figures from the 1970s include:


Batman (1979, Sealed)

Micronauts Sharkos Vehicle (Complete w/Box)

Robin (1974, Sealed)

Batgirl (1973, Sealed)

Batman 12" Figure (1976, Complete w/Box)

Conan the Barbarian (1975, Sealed)

Batman Fly Away (1978, Sealed)

Robin Fly Away (1978, Sealed)

Wonder Woman (Linda Carter TV Show, Sealed)

Peter Parker

Iron Man (1973, Sealed)



 

Star Wars action figures from the late 1970s almost all have some value. If they are sealed in their original packages (or if the vehicles/playsets have the boxes), then they will sell for hundreds or thousands, depending on the character and condition. The vinyl cape Jawa and 1979 Boba Fett are some of the most well-known vintage action figures among the entire collecting community. If you have a collection of Star Wars from the 1970s, then be sure to call, email or text us for more information, as you may be sitting on a collection of very expensive action figures. Note that while we only list a few of the most valuable figures here, there are still plenty more worth big bucks.


Some of the most valuable Star Wars action figures from the 1970s include:


Boba Fett (1979, 21 Back Card, Sealed)

Luke Skywalker (1977, 12 Back Card, Yellow or Blonde Hair, Sealed)

Darth Vader (1977, 12 Back Card, Sealed)

Creatures 3 Pack (1978, Sealed)

Boba Fett (1979, Return of the Jedi, Sealed)

Droids 3 Pack (1978, Sealed)

IG-88 15" Figure (1978, Sealed)

Villains 3 Pack (1978, Sealed)

R2D2 (1978, 12 Back, Sealed)

Imperial Tie-Fighter (1978, Unopened)

Han Solo (1977, Small Head, Sealed)

Chewbacca (1978, Green Crossbow, Sealed)

Obi-Wan Kenobi (1978, 12 Back, Sealed)

Princess Leia (1978, 20 Back Card, Sealed)

Vinyl Cape Jawa (1977, Sealed)



 

Generally speaking, if you have a collection of toys from the 1900s thru the 1970s, then you have a bigger chance of having something worth the money. The actual value will depend on the content, condition, packaging, and overall rarity. If you have some early, classic toys and die-cast cars (Corgi, Matchbox, Dinky, Tri-Ang, etc) then we suggest buying this price guide to help you look up any specific toy values.


Toy Collectors Price Guide

 

If You Have a Collection of 1980s Toys and Action Figures You're Looking to Sell


The 1980s changed the game when it comes to action figures and toys in general. Toy lines such as Masters of the Universe, GI Joe, and Transformers quickly caught on and are still in demand today. While many of these figures can be easy to find opened/loose, they can be much tougher to find sealed in their original package. This is because most kids at the time opened their toys. This has led unopened action figures from the 80s to be worth much more today.


 

Masters of the Universe action figures from the 1980s are the definitive 80s toys and are very popular among collectors. Many will sell for some money even if they are loose and incomplete. They can sell for hundreds (or thousands) if they are sealed and the card and bubble are in good shape. If you have any good characters in sealed packages and high grades, then we recommend sending those to AFA for grading (see our grading guide below). Some of the more popular action figures from this line can sell for hundreds even if they are loose, due to massive demand.


Some of the most valuable Masters of the Universe action figures from the 80s include:


He-Man (1981, 8 Back, Sealed)

Scare-Glow (1986, Sealed)

Tytus, Heroic Giant Warlord (1987, Beware of Fakes)

Skeletor (1983, 8 Back, Sealed)

Wun-Dar (1981 Wonder Bread Mailaway, Beware of Fakes)

Snake Mountain Playset (1983, Unopened)



 

GI Joe action figures from the 1980s generally fall into the same boat as Masters of the Universe in regards to having a very loyal fanbase. Generally, even if they are loose, then the more popular characters will sell for at least some money. If they are sealed, then most figures will sell for hundreds (or sometimes thousands) of dollars. GI Joe action figures generally have a lot of small parts, that can be easy to lose. If you're missing any parts or the filecard, then the value of the action figures or playsets will drop substantially, depending on how much you're missing. Also, note that some figures will have a broken waist (often referred to as an o-ring). This can happen even if the figure is sealed and it will affect the value. Generally, if you have a collection of loose GI Joe action figures, then it's usually easier to sell them in lots.


Some of the most valuable GI Joe figures from the 80s include:


Storm Shadow, Cobra Ninja (1985, Sealed)

USS Flagg Aircraft Carrier (1985, Hard to Find, Complete w/Box)

Snake Eyes, Commando Version (1982, Sealed)

Destro, Arms Dealer (1983, Sealed)

Snake Eyes w/Timber (1985, Sealed)



 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles action figures from the 1980s generally don't sell for much if they are opened/loose, but if they are sealed then most will sell for some money. Today the demand for these figures is only growing as the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles are household names and many want the original action figures. Note that while this line started in the late 1980s, many of the hardest-to-find and most valuable action figures from this series are from the 1990s.


Some of the most valuable Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles action figures from the 80s include:


TMNT Sewer Playset (1989, Sealed)

TMNT Party Wagon (1989, Sealed)

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (all 4) with Fan Club Insert (1988, Sealed) TMNT Footcruiser Vehicle (1989, Sealed)

TMNT Turtle Blimp (1989, Sealed)



 

Transformers from the 1980s (often referred to as Generation 1) are some of the more popular action figures from the decade. There is a huge collectors market for anything that is complete or has a box. Some of the more valuable pieces are the original action figures released towards the beginning of the run. Note that both the Takara (original Japanese) figures and Hasbro Transformers have value.


Some of the most valuable Transformers action figures from the 80s include:


Diaclone Battle Convoy/Optimus Prime (Takara, Complete w/Box)

Transformers G1 Optimus Prime (1984, Hasbro, Sealed)

Transformers G1 Fortress Maximus (1987, Hasbro, Sealed)

Transformers G1 Jetfire (1985, Hasbro, Sealed)

Transformers G1 Omega Supreme (1985, Hasbro, Sealed)

Transformers G1 Jetfire (1985, Hasbro, Sealed)

Transformers G1 Deadwind (Hasbro, Sealed)

Transformers G1 Ultra Magnus (Hasbro, Sealed)

Transformers Cyclonus (1986, Hasbro, Sealed)

Transformers G1 Overlord God Master (1988, Takara, Sealed)

Transformers G1 Metroplex (Hasbro, Sealed)

Transformers G1 Optimus Prime w/Pepsi Logo (Hasbro, Sealed)

Transformers G1 Pre-Rub Soundwave (1984, Hasbro, Sealed)



 

Star Wars action figures from the 1980s can generally be just as valuable as figures from the previous decade. Like many other toy lines, if you have these figures in their original package then the value goes up considerably. Note that there were dozens of different figures from different movies and toy lines released in the 80s and a handful of the most valuable can sell for hundreds (sometimes thousands) even without the package. Some of the Power of the Force coins can sell for good money without the original figure. Note that while we only list a few of the most valuable figures here, there are still plenty more worth big bucks.


Some of the most valuable Star Wars action figures from the 80s include:


Boba Fett (1983, 65 Back, Return of the Jedi, Sealed)

Luke Skywalker (1983, 77 Back, Return of the Jedi, Sealed)

Stormtrooper Luke Skywalker (1985, Power of the Force, Sealed)

Boba Fett (1980, 21 Back, Empire Strikes Back, Sealed)

Biker Scout (1983, Return of the Jedi, Sealed)

2-1B Droid (1980, Empire Strikes Back, Sealed)

Millennium Falcon (1983, Return of the Jedi, Unopened)

Han Solo (1980, Empire Strikes Back, Sealed)

Jedi Luke Skywalker (1983, Return of the Jedi, Sealed)

Darth Vader (1980, 41 Back, Empire Strikes Back, Sealed)

Anakin Skywalker (1985, 92 Back, Power of the Force, Sealed)

Yak Face (1985, 92 Back, Power of the Force, Sealed)

Yoda (1985, 92 Back, Power of the Force, Sealed)



 

WWF LJN action figures from the 1980s generally sell for some money even if they are loose (prices have gone up over the past few years). If you have some of the more well-known wrestlers such as Hulk Hogan, and Randy Savage then you will get more money. Most sealed LJN WWF wrestlers will sell for hundreds, due to increasing demand.


Some of the most valuable WWF LJN action figures from the 80s include:


Hulk Hogan (1989, White Shirt, Black Card, Sealed)

Warlord (1989, Black Card, Sealed)

Hulk Hogan and Hillbilly Jim Tag Team 2 Pack (Sealed)

Strike Force Tag Team 2 Pack (Sealed)

Harley Race (1985, Blue Card, Sealed)

Vince McMahon (1987, Blue Card, Sealed)

Koko B Ware (1987, Blue Card, Sealed)

Hulk Hogan (1989, Red Shirt, Black Card, Sealed)

Hulk Hogan (1985, No Shirt, Blue Card, Sealed)

Macho Man, Randy Savage (1986, Blue Card, Sealed)



 

AWA Remco wrestling action figures were also released in the 80s. The larger-scale figures can be very hard to find, especially sealed in the original package. They can sell for hundreds (sometimes thousands) if the card and bubble are in good shape. The smaller-scale, tag-team 2 pack figures don't sell for too much if they're opened, but they can sell for some money if they're sealed.


Some of the most valuable Remco AWA action figures from the 80s include:


All-Star Wrestlers Mat Mania Shawn Michaels (1986, Sealed)

All-Star Wrestlers Mat Mania the Sheik (1986, Sealed)

All-Star Wrestlers Mat Mania Boris Zhukov (1986, Sealed)

All-Star Wrestlers Mat Mania Ric Flair (1985, Sealed)

All-Star Wrestlers Mat Mania Buddy Rose (1986, Sealed)

All-Star Wrestlers Mat Mania Marty Jannetty (1986, Sealed)

All-Star Wrestlers Mat Mania Doug Somers (1986, Sealed)

All-Star Wrestlers Mat Mania Referee Dick Woehrle (1986, Sealed)



 

Mattel Barbie dolls from the 1980s are generally less valuable than the previous decades, but they still have a following. You generally want to try to have Barbies from the 80s in their original box for them to have any kind of value.


Some of the most valuable Barbie dolls from the 80s include:


Barbie's Dream House (Various Types)

Magic Curl Barbie (1981, Complete w/Box)

Christy and Golden Dream Barbie (Complete w/Box)

Miss Beach Barbie (Complete w/Box)

Dream Date PJ Barbie (1982, Complete w/Box)


 

DC Super Powers and Marvel Secret Wars action figures from the 1980s won't sell for too much if they are opened (with some exceptions). However, if they're sealed, then they will most likely sell for some money (prices vary). Prices for both lines today are slowing creeping up as more comic book fans are starting to collect these.


Some of the most valuable Marvel and DC action figures from the 80s include:


Batman (DC Super Powers, 1985, Sealed)

Wonder Woman (DC Super Powers, 1985, Sealed)

Cyborg (DC Super Powers, 1986, Sealed)

Hall of Justice Playset (DC Super Powers, 1984, Sealed)

Shazam (DC Super Powers, 1986, Sealed)

Clark Kent (DC Super Powers, Mail-Away)

Super Hero 3 Pack (Marvel Secret Wars, 1984, Sealed)

Villain 3 Pack (Marvel Secret Wars, 1984, Sealed)

Tower of Doom Playset (Marvel Secret Wars, 1984, Sealed)

Iceman (Marvel Secret Wars, 1986, Sealed)

Constrictor (Marvel Secret Wars, 1986, Sealed)

Dr. Doom (Marvel Secret Wars, 1984, Sealed)



 

While action figures from the 80s generally vary greatly in value, there are plenty of them that are worth something. The most valuable 80s toys are mostly from Star Wars, Transformers, and Masters of the Universe. Please remember that a sealed action figure sells for much more than an opened/loose toy (so don't get your hopes up if you have something on this list that is loose or incomplete). While it can be hard to find 80s toys sealed in the original package, toys from the next era are generally much easier to find unopened.


 

If You Have a Collection of 1990s Toys and Action Figures You're Looking to Sell


Many 1990s action figures and toys don't have much value, especially if they're open/loose. This is because many toys from this period were overproduced and the supply is quite high, even if they're sealed. Most people purchased 90s action figures in hopes that they would go up in value later on. This caused supply to greatly exceed demand. For many years toys from the 90s were worth little to nothing, with a few exceptions (TMNT, WWF, Power Rangers). Today prices are slowly going up for many 90s toy lines, as those who were younger at the time get older and want to collect toys from their childhood. Note that certain action figures such as Hasbro WWF, Power Rangers, and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles can be worth some good money today, especially if they're sealed.


 

Star Wars action figures from the 1990s are extremely common, even if they're sealed. If you have a collection of 1990s Star Wars figures, then don't expect to get much. Also, if you're not familiar with Star Wars action figures and have some loose ones, the best way to identify whether you have a valuable 1970s or 1980s figure or a not-so-valuable 1990s figure the look for a date (usually located under the foot of the toy). We highly recommend selling your 1990s Star Wars toy collection in bulk, or you'll most likely be stuck with the low-value figures.


Some of the most valuable Star Wars action figures from the 90s include:


Star Wars Power of the Force X-Wing (1997, Complete w/Box)

Star Wars Episode 1 Naboo Fighter (1999, Complete w/Box)

Star Wars Power of the Force Tie-Fighter (Complete w/Box)

Star Wars Power of the Force Snowspeeder (Complete w/Box)

Star Wars Power of the Force Millennium Falcon (Complete w/Box)



 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles action figures from the 1990s can sometimes be tough to find in their original packages, depending on the character, and can sell for more than their 80s counterparts. Some of the figures from the 90s can be very popular among collectors, and if you have any of these, then you'll find it easy to sell these.


Some of the most valuable Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles action figures from the 90s include:


TMNT Scratch the Cat (1993)

TMNT Hot Spot (1993, Sealed)

Fan Club Flyer's TMNT Undercover (All 4 Turtles, Sealed)

TMNT Technodrome (1990, Sealed)

TMNT Michelangelo as Frankenstein (Sealed)

TMNT Channel 6 News Van (1992, Sealed)

TMNT Shogun Triceraton (1994, Sealed)

TMNT Warrior Chrome Dome (Sealed)

TMNT Needlenose Playset (Sealed)

TMNT Dino, Tyranno Shredder (1997, Sealed) TMNT Donatello as Michael Jordan Giant (1992, Sealed)

TMNT Shogun Shoate (1994, Sealed)



 

Marvel and DC action figures from the 1990s have gone up in value recently, but they are still generally inexpensive online, due to them being so common. If you have a collection of Marvel or DC action figures from the 90s, then they might have a small amount of value, if the collection is sealed and has big-name characters (Spider-Man, Batman, Wolverine, etc). Generally speaking, the most valuable 90s superhero action figures are all lines related to Spider-Man and Batman (ex: Batman the Animated Series, Batman the Dark Knight Collection, Spider-Man the Animated Series, etc).


Some of the most valuable Marvel and DC action figures from the 90s include:


Batman Returns Command Center Batcave (Kenner, 1991, Sealed)

Spider-Man the Animated Series Spider-Slayer (ToyBiz, 1996, Sealed)

Batman Animated Series Combat Belt Batman (Kenner, 1992, Sealed)

Batman Animated Series Batmobile (Kenner, 1992, Sealed)

Spider-Man Animated Series Daily Bugle (ToyBiz, 1994, Sealed)

X-Men Danger Room Playset (ToyBiz, 1995, Sealed)

X-Men Sentinel Playset (ToyBiz, 1994, Sealed)

Spider-Man Maximum Clonage Pack (ToyBiz, 1997, Sealed)

Spider-Man the Animated Series, Kingpin's Crime Central (ToyBiz, 1994, Sealed)

Batman the Animated Series Batcave (Kenner, 1994, Sealed)

Marvel Superhero Training Center (ToyBiz, 1990, Sealed)


ToyBiz Daredevil Action Figure

 

Mattel Barbie dolls from the 1990s are generally the most common and least desirable among doll collectors. That makes them the least valuable dolls from Mattel. If you have any Barbie dolls from the 90s, then you'll find that they are very difficult to sell, even if they are brand new in the box. We recommend trying to sell them in lots, or you might be stuck with some of the more common dolls.


Some of the most valuable Barbie dolls from the 90s include:


Glitter Hair Barbie (1993, Sealed)

Sohni Punjab Di (Expressions of India, Sealed)

Cut and Style Barbie (1994, Sealed)

Jewel Hair Mermaid Barbie (1994, Sealed)


 

GI Joe action figures from the 90s are much more common and have less demand than the figures from the 80s. That being said, there are still plenty of figures from this period that have some value. Among the most valuable GI Joe toys from the 90s are many vehicles and playsets. There are also some sealed action figures from the early part of the 90s that can sell for money online. Generally speaking, we recommend selling any loose 90s GI Joe action figures in lots, so you don't get stuck with the less popular toys.


Some of the most valuable GI Joe action figures from the 90s include:


GI Joe Mobile Strike Headquarters (1990, Sealed)

GI Joe Hammerhead (1990, Sealed)

GI Joe the General Vehicle (1990, Unopened)

GI Joe Cobra Hurricane Vechiel (1990, Unopened)

GI Joe Toxo-Lab Eco-Warriors (1992, Unopened)

GI Joe Conquest X-30 Fighter Jet (1998, Unopened)

GI Joe Cobra Desert Scorpion (1990, Sealed)

GI Joe Cobra Night-Creeper, Cobra Ninja (1990, Sealed)

GI Joe Skypatrol Drop Zone (1990, Sealed)



 

Power Rangers from the 1990s generally have some value, due to high demand. The Zords are usually the most expensive, especially if they are complete with the original boxes or sealed. Note that the demand for original Power Rangers action figures and Zords has dropped over the past few years as Bandai has re-released many of the originals with better sculpts and designs (some with die-cast metal parts).


Some of the most valuable Power Rangers action figures from the 90s include:


Shogun Megazord (1995, Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, Sealed)

Deluxe Dino Megazord (1993, Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, Sealed)

Deluxe Mega Forming Rescue Megazord (1998, Power Rangers in Space, Sealed)

Super Zeo Megazord (1996, Power Rangers Zeo, Sealed)

Lightspeed Deluxe Megazord (1999, Power Rangers Rescue, Sealed)

Auto Morpin Ninjor (1995, Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, Sealed)

White and Green Ranger Gold Team 2 Pack (1994, Sealed)

Dragonzord (1994, Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, Sealed)

White Ranger Auto-Morphin Action Figure (1994, Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, Sealed)

Red Battlezord Megazord (1996, Power Rangers Zeo, Sealed)



 

Transformers continued in their popularity through the 1990s. Some of the more popular lines from the 90s include Beast Wars and Generation 2. While it can be easier to find these figures sealed in their original packages (compared to G1 action figures), they can still sell for some money, depending on the character, and demand. Generally speaking though, Transformers from the 90s are worth less than figures from the previous decade.


Some of the most valuable Transformers action figures from the 90s include:


Transformers G2 Orange Devastator (KB Toys Exclusive)

Transformers G2 Optimus Prime Laser Collectors Edition (1992, Sealed)

Beast Wars Antagony (1998 Botcon Exclusive, Sealed)

Transformers G2 Snarl (Sealed)

Transformers G2 Grimlock (Sealed)

Beast Wars Tigerhawk (1999, Sealed)

Transformers G2 Slag (Sealed)

Beast Wars Inferno (1996, Sealed)

Beast Wars Deluxe Dinobot (1995, Sealed)

Beast Wars Onyx Primal (1996 Botcon Exclusive, Sealed)

Beast Wars Tri-Logo Transmetal Depth Charge (Kenner, 1998, Sealed)



 

Beanie Babies are very well-known among the general public for their rise and popularity along with their sudden fall. They never recovered from the crash, and most Beanie Babies remain worth little to nothing. If you have a collection of these stuffed animals, then we suggest selling them in lots, as they can be very tough to sell individually. There are only a very few select Beanie Babies (variants mostly) worth something. Be careful when researching values for Beanie Babies as many times asking (and even sold) prices aren't accurate. Many times some sellers are looking to manipulate the market. Most sales will be Buy-It-Now or an auction with a single bid, which is a red flag. Note that we aren't going to list valuable Beanie Babies as we don't want to confuse anyone reading this.



 

McFarlane action figures from the 1990s are important because they would lay the foundations for the modern action figure that focused on sculpting and design. While the early action figures from McFarlane are significant, they are still very common (even if they're sealed) and the demand isn't nearly big enough to keep up. That being said, there are only a handful of McFarlane Toys from the 1990s that have any value (mostly horror and video game action figures from the late 90s).


Some of the most valuable McFarlane action figures from the 90s include:


McFarlane Movie Maniacs Freddy Krueger and Jason 2 Pack (1999, Sealed)

McFarlane Metal Gear Solid 1 Solid Snake (1998, Sealed)

McFarlane Movie Maniacs Bride of Chucky 2 Pack (1999, Sealed)

McFarlane Metal Gear Solid 1 Ninja (1998, Sealed)

McFarlane Sleepy Hollow, Headless Horsemen (1999, Sealed)

McFarlane Movie Maniacs Crow, Eric Draven 12" Figure (1999, Sealed)

McFarlane Movie Maniacs Pumpkin Head (1999, Sealed)



 

WWF Hasbro action figures from the 1990s all have some kind of value, due to ever-increasing demand. They generally don't sell for big bucks if they are opened/loose (with a few exceptions), but most of the figures will sell for some money if they're sealed. Hasbro WWF figures are generally accepted as some of the more popular action figures from the 1990s. Please note that WWF Hasbro was followed by the Jakks action figures in the late 90s, which are generally low in value with some early exceptions.


Some of the most valuable Hasbro WWF action figures from the 90s line include:


Undertaker (Mail-Away)

Hulk Hogan (1993, Red Shirt, Mail-Away)

Dusty Rhodes (1991, Sealed)

Crush (1994, Green Card, Sealed)

Ravishing Rick Rude (Blue Card, Sealed)

Undertaker (Red Card, Sealed)

Mach Man Randy Savage (Series 1, Blue Card, Sealed)

Ludvig Borga (1994, Green Card, Sealed)

Billy Gunn (1994, Green Card, Sealed)

Bart Gunn (1994, Green Card, Sealed)

123 Kid (1994, Green Card, Sealed)

King of the Ring Playset (1993, Red Box, Sealed)



 

While there are many action figures from the 1990s that have very little value there are still some that have some worth to them. If you bought stuff like Power Rangers, TMNT, or WWF Hasbro, then you'll most likely have no difficulty selling your collection. If you have some of the more common, low-value 1990s action figures (Star Wars, Marvel, DC, etc), then we recommend trying to sell those in bulk or lots. It will make life much easier when selling your action figure collection. This would keep you from getting stuck with the less desirable figures that would be otherwise tough to sell.


 

If You Have a Collection of Toys, Pops, or Action Figures from the 2000s or 2010s You're Looking to Sell


Action figures from the 2000s aren't as common as figures from the 1990s. More importantly, we would see a better quality for figures during this period, so collectors prefer them for display purposes. We would also see the rise of the very high-end action figures that would retail for hundreds of dollars. This is because many collectors from previous decades would graduate to figures of better quality as they got older.


 

Marvel Legends from the 2000s have some value if they are loose/complete or sealed. Most figures range in value from $15-50. Some collectors like to display these action figures, which keeps demand healthy. That being said, please note that these figures need to be in good shape and include accessories, or they will sell for less. All 6" scale Marvel action figures from the 2000s (Spider-Man Classics, X-Men Classics, Spider-Man Origins, etc) fall into the same price range. The actual value of a particular action figure depends on the specific demand. We find selling loose Marvel Legends in lots to be the easiest. Also, note that there are some bootlegs of Marvel Legends online, so beware when buying certain figures.


Some of the most valuable Marvel Legends and related action figures from the 2000s and up include:


Spider-Man 2099 (Spider-Man Classics, Must Include Comic, Sealed)

Sentinel and Galactus (Hasbro Pulse, Sealed)

Dragon Man (Fantastic Four Classics, Beware of Fakes, Sealed)

Fin Fang Foom (Hasbro ML BAF)

Captain America 75th Anniversary Metal Shield

Thunderbolts 5 Pack (SDCC 2013 Exclusive)

Wrestler Spider-Man Movie (2002, Sealed)

Book of Vishante, Doctor Strange Pack (SDCC 2015 Exclusive)

Spider-Man Movie (2002, w/Gargoyle Base)

Kaine (Scarlet Spider)

Savage Land 3 Pack (SDCC 2008 Exclusive)

Pitt BAF (ToyBiz Legendary Heroes, Not Marvel Legends)

Guardians of the Galaxy Pack (Entertainment Earth Exclusive)

Superposable Spider-Man (Spider-Man Classics, McFarlane Art Style, 2004, Sealed)



 

DC Universe Classics and Multiverse action figures are generally comparable to Marvel Legends in regards to value (most range from $15-50). Most DC action figures from the 2000s aren't exceptionally valuable, but some are worth more than others, depending on the characters and general demand. Note that McFarlane Toys took over the DC Multiverse action figures in the late 2010s after a long run from Mattel. Some of the convention exclusives and chase variants are among the most valuable figures from this series.


Some of the most valuable DC Universe Classics and Multiverse action figures from the 2000s and up include:


Gentlemen Ghost (DCUC Wave 8, Beware of Fakes, Sealed)

Giganta Collect & Connect (DCUC Wave 8, Collect & Connect Figure)

Lobo w/Dawg (DCUC, SDCC Exclusive)

Legion of Superheroes 12 Pack (DCUC, Matty Collector Exclusive)

Superman vs He-Man 2 Pack (DCUC, Toys R Us Exclusive)

Arkham Knight Batman (DC Multiverse, Platinum Edition)

Wonder Twins with Gleek (DCUC, SDCC Exclusive, Beware of Fakes, Sealed)

Lobo, Grey Chase, Platinum Variant (DC Multiverse, Sealed)

King Shark (DC Multiverse, Collect & Connect)



 

McFarlane's action figures from the 2000s and up can be somewhat difficult to value as there is a large variety. Some of the lines produced by McFarlane during this period include Halo, Walking Dead, Movie Maniacs (various movies), anime-related figures, and of course Spawn. Most Spawn and comic lines from the 2000s have some kind of value (pretty much the opposite of the 1990s Spawn figures), due to great quality and demand. However, some other lines such as Guitar Hero have almost no value.


Some of the most valuable McFarlane action figures from the 2000s and up include:


Matrix Sentinel Deluxe Boxed Set (Sealed)

Gunslinger Spawn 12" (Art of Spawn, 2005, Sealed)

Beatles Saturday Morning Cartoons (2004, Sealed)

Jaws Deluxe Set (Movie Maniacs Series 4, 2001, Sealed)

Metallica Harvester of Sorrows 4 Pack (Sealed)

Texas Chainsaw Massacre Leatherface 18" Figure (Sealed)

Motley Crue, Shout at the Devil Boxed Set (Sealed)

Spawn 12", Issue 7 Cover (Art of Spawn, 2006, Sealed)

Destiny 2, Lord Shanxx 10" Figure (Sealed)

Titanfall 2, BT-7274, and Pilot Jack Deluxe Pack (Sealed)

Hanging Spawn, Issue 30 (Art of Spawn, Sealed)

Nightmare Spawn (Spawn Series 31, 2007, Sealed)



 

Hot Toys and related 1/6 scale action figures became popular in the early 2000s with their high quality, articulation, and sculpt. Aftermarket prices have gone down a bit over the years due to re-releases and larger production runs, but most Hot Toys still have some value, due to the high retail prices and amazing quality. If you have a collection of Hot Toys, then it will be much easier to sell them if they are complete with the box. Also, be aware of fakes/bootleg Hot Toys being sold online.


Some of the most valuable Hot Toys action figures from the 2000s and up include:


Star Wars Han Solo and Chewy 2 Pack (Complete w/Box)

Avengers Age of Ultron Hulkbuster Deluxe (Complete w/Box)

Star Wars Arc Trooper Five (Complete w/Box)

Back to the Future Delorean (Complete w/Box)

Aliens Ripley w/Power Loader (Complete w/Box)

The Dark Knight Armory (Complete w/Box)

Batman 1989 Joker Deluxe (Complete w/Box)

Batman Returns Bruce Wayne and Batman (Complete w/Box)

Superman Movie (Sideshow Exclusive, Complete w/Box)

Dark Knight Joker Deluxe Edition (Sideshow Exclusive, Complete w/Box)

Batman 1989 Batmobile (Complete w/Box)


Hot Toys Spider-Man

 

WWE/WWF action figures from the 2000s can be a bit of a mixed bag. While the WWE Classics line can sell for money (depending on the wrestler), most other figures from Jakks can sell for little. The Mattel action figures are similar in that the Elite and Legends action figures can sell for some cash, while the basic line of figures can be a little tough to sell. If you have a collection that's a random assortment of WWE action figures, then we recommend selling them in a lot (especially if they're loose) as demand is very low for most modern wrestling toys.


Some of the most valuable WWE action figures from the 2000s and up include:


Road Warriors Hawk and Animal 2 Pack (Jakks, WWE Classic Superstars, Sealed)

Texas Tornado (WWE Legends, Elite, Series 6, Sealed)

Rey Mysterio and Eddie Guerrero 2 Pack (Jakks, WWE Classic Superstars, Sealed)

Hardy Boys 2 Pack (Jakks, WWE Classics Superstars, Sealed)

Akeem (WWE Legends, Elite, Series 5, Sealed)

Meng (Jakks, WWE Classics, Sealed)

Mach Man Randy Savage (WWE Elite, Ringside Collectibles Ex, Sealed)

CM Punk (Masked, Elite, Ringside Collectibles Exclusive, Sealed)

Haku (WWE Classic Superstars, Series 25, Sealed)



 

Marvel and DC Statues (Sideshow, Bowen, Kotobukiya, etc) produced by companies such as Bowen, and Iron Studios have a huge collectors market. Even the smallest mini-busts can sell for some money, due to high retail prices and limited runs. Please note that condition is important when it comes to selling statues. Damaged (or incomplete/without box) statues will usually sell for much less than perfect, never opened pieces. Generally speaking, most small busts and statues sell for between $30-400 (Bowen, Kotobukiya, DC Collectibles), while larger-scale statues (XM, Iron Studios, Sideshow, etc) can vary from $300 to thousands of dollars, depending on the manufacturer, character, and edition size.


Some of the most valuable larger-scale statues include:


Sideshow Collectibles Dr. Doom on Throne Premium Format Statue (Complete w/Box)

XM Studios Magneto on Throne 1/4 Scale Statue (Complete w/Box)

Sideshow Collectibles Spider-Man Negative Variant (Limited to 75 Complete w/Box)

Iron Studios Deluxe Sentinel 1:10 Scale Diorama (Complete w/Box)

Sideshow Pumpkinhead 1/4 Scale Statue (Complete w/Box)

Iron Studios Hawkman 1/4 Scale Statue (Complete w/Box)

Sideshow Ardeth Life-Size Bust (Complete w/Box)

Sideshow Life-Size Han Solo in Carbonite Statue (All Life-Size Statues Have Value)

Sideshow Boba Fett Bronze Statue (Limited to 75)

Sideshow Alien Queen 1/3 Scale Bust (Complete w/Box)

Sideshow Hulk vs Spider-Man Statue, Grey Version (Complete w/Box)

Prime 1 Studio Poison Ivy 1/4 Scale Statue (Complete w/Box)



Some of the most valuable smaller-scale statues include:


Bowen Batman Bronze Statue (All Bronze Bowens Have Value)

Bowen Silver Surfer Chrome Museum Pose Full-Size Statue

Bowen Wendigo Full-Size Statue

Bowen Sunfire Full-Size Statue

Kotobukiya Ikemen Red Hood (1st Edition w/Bonus Parts)

Tweeterhead Catwoman Julie Newmar TV Show Statue

Tweeterhead Batgirl TV Show Statue

Bowen Hela Full-Size Statue

Bowen Cable Full-Size Statue (Retro Costume)

Bowen X-Men Mini Bust 5 Pack (Retro, Variant)

Bowen Moon Knight Statue (White Costume)

Kotobukiya Bishoujo Phoenix Statue (White Costume SDCC 2010 Exclusive)



 

Transformers made in the 2000s saw a gradual increase in quality (like many lines). They would also see an increase in convention exclusives. Some of the exclusives can sell for good money online. With growing popularity due to the movies and TV shows, there developed a strong collectors market for modern Transformers figures. That being said, if you have a random, loose assortment of newer Transformers, then it might be easier to sell them in lots online.


Some of the most valuable Transformers action figures from the 2000s and up include:


Transformers Dawn of Future's Past Boxset (2006 Botcon Exclusive, Sealed)

Transformers War for Cybertron Unicron (Hasbro Pulse Exclusive, Sealed)

Transformers Armada Unicron (2003, Sealed)

Transformers Masterpiece Laserwave (Takara, Sealed)

Transformers Masterpiece Optimus Prime (Takara, Sealed)

Transformers Pirates vs Knights 5 Pack (2014 Botcon Ex, Sealed)

Transformers Generations Fortress Maximus (2013 SDCC Exclusive)

Transformers Combiner Wars Dawn of the Predacus (2016 Botcon Exclusive, Sealed)

Auto-Converting Optimus Prime (Hasbro Pulse, Sealed)

Transformers Metroplex (2013 SDCC Exclusive, Sealed)


Hasbro Pulse Unicron

 

Funko Pops have become extremely popular, but note that a good majority of these vinyl figures don't have much value. The only ones that can have value are the earlier releases, Freddy Funkos (very limited), convention exclusives (only some), and long vaulted/retired Pops. Condition is very important with Funko Pops, and if the box is slightly damaged, then the value can greatly be affected. That being said, note that most Funko Pops are relatively easy to sell online, but the competition can be fierce, so be sure to price accordingly. We recommend putting the lower value Pops in lots to make things easier. Also beware, as Funko Pops bootlegs have become very common. You'll see plenty of hard-to-find (but fake) Pops for very cheap on places like eBay. Note that while we list some of the more valuable Funko Pops here, there are still plenty more worth some good money.


Some of the most valuable Funko Pops include:


Freddy Funko Jack Skellington (SDCC Exclusive, Limited to 24, Unopened)

Dumbo (Gold, SDCC Exclusive, Unopened)

Freddy Funko Ghost Rider (SDCC Exclusive, Limited to 96, Unopened)

Dumbo Clown Version (SDCC Exclusive, Unopened)

Freddy Funko as Batman (SDCC Exclusive, Unopened)

Dragon Ball Z Planet Arlia Vegeta (Toy Tokyo Exclusive)

Unmasked, Glow in the Dark, Wolverine (Toytastik Exclusive, Limited to 500)

Metallic Comic Book Spider-Man (SDCC 2011 Exclusive, Limited to 480)

Green Lantern Glow in the Dark (SDCC 2010 Exclusive)

Star Wars Sith Trooper (SDCC Exclusive)

Cheshire Cat (SDCC 2012 Exclusive, Limited to 480)

Funko Force Metallic Batman (All Funko Force Have Value)

Freddy Funko Iron Man (SDCC Exclusive, Limited to 96, Unopened)

Boba Fett from Star Wars Droids (SDCC Exclusive, Limited to 480, Unopened)

Holographic Darth Maul (SDCC Exclusive, Limited to 480, Unopened)



 

Star Wars action figures from the 2000s are a bit tough to price. While some exclusives and popular characters (Darth Malak, Darth Revan, etc) can be popular and sell for money online, most 3-3/4" action figures from the 2000s don't have any major value. The same goes for the Star Wars Black action figures. Some earlier release Star Wars Black 6" scale action figures (ex: Boba Fett, Princess Leia) can sell for cash, but most of the later release figures don't have much value, although they are quite popular. If you have a random assortment of the smaller scale figures, then we recommend selling them in lots. LEGO Star Wars has, however, a huge following and dedicated fanbase, so if you have bigger sets, then you will have an easier time selling them.


Some of the most valuable Star Wars action figures from the 2000s and up include:


Order 66 Stormtrooper (Star Wars Black, Entertainment Earth Ex, Sealed)

Vintage Collection Deathstar (SDCC 2011 Exclusive, Unopened)

Yoda Chronicles Holocron Chamber Press (Lego, 2013)

Deathstar Original Trilogy Edition (Lego, Unopened)

Vintage Collection Jabba's Sail Barge w/Yakface (Unopened)

Millennium Falcon (Lego, Ultimate Collectors Edition)

Cloud City (Lego, Unopened)

Army of the Republic Dropship (Lego, Unopened)

Darth Vader Bust (Lego 2019, Unopened)

Imperial Star Destroyer (Lego, Unopened)

Jabba the Hutt's Throne Room (Star Wars Black, 2014 SDCC Exclusive, Unopened)

Boba Fett and Han Solo in Carbonite (Star Wars Black, 2013 SDCC Ex, Sealed)

Star Wars Millennium Falcon (Legacy Collection, 2008, Unopened)

Arc Troopers Battle Pack (Clone Wars, Sealed)



 

Masters of the Universe action figures from the 2000s are extremely popular with collectors and figures from all lines (200x, Classics, Super 7, etc) can be easy to sell. Prices can vary from $20 to hundreds of dollars. The most popular figures from these lines can include the more well-known characters such as He-Man and Skeletor, but also convention exclusives and limited editions.


Some of the most valuable Masters of the Universe action figures from the 2000s and up include:


Snakemen Mecha Blade He-Man (200x MOTU, Sealed)

Snakemen Mecha Blade Skeletor (200x MOTU, Sealed)

Snake Mountain (Super 7, Masters of the Universe Classics, Unopened)

Castle Greyskull (Masters of the Universe Classics, Unopened)

Granamyr (Red & Green, Masters of the Universe Classics, Sealed)

King Greyskull (Masters of the Universe Classics, SDCC Ex)

Ultimate He-Man (Super 7, Sealed)

Horde Zombie He-Man (Masters of the Universe Classics, Sealed)

Scareglow (Masters of the Universe Classics, Sealed)

Stratos, Prince Adam, Trap-Jaw 3 Pack (Super 7, Power-Con Ex, Sealed)

Fisto (Masters of the Universe Classics, Sealed)



 

NECA action figures from the 2000s fall into the same boat as McFarlane Toys. Some of the most popular NECA figures would be from their line of Cult Classics (movie-related) figures. They've also produced many action figures based on popular video games. Please be careful when buying NECA action figures online, as there are quite a few fake/bootleg products being sold.


Some of the most valuable NECA action figures from the 2000s and up include:


Nightmare Before Christmas Sally and Jack Wedding 2 Pack (Very Rare, Sealed)

Halloween, Evolution of Michael Myers (Cult Classics, Sealed)

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Color Boxset (NYCC Exclusive, Sealed)

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Black and White Boxset (SDCC Exclusive, Sealed)

Halloween Michael Myers 18" Figure (2007, Sealed)

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Raphael in Disguise 18" Figure (Sealed)

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Cartoon Boxset (SDCC 2017 Exclusive)

Hellraiser Cenobite Lair Box Set (Sealed)

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Foot Soldier Boxset (SDCC 2016 Ex)

Halloween, Michael Myers as Ghost (Cult Classics, Sealed)

Friday the 13th, Pamela and Jason Voorhees 2 Pack (SDCC 2015 Exclusive, Sealed)



 

GI Joe action figures from the 2000s continued to have a dedicated base of fans with the release of lines such as the 25th-anniversary series, and GI Joe Classified (6" scale). Note that there are quite a bit of GI Joe action figures from this period and only a handful have some value. If you have 3-3/4" action figures that are opened/loose, then your best bet to sell your figure collection would be to sell them in lots.


Some of the most valuable GI Joe action figures from the 2000s and up include:


GI Joe Classified Snake Eyes Deluxe (Hasbro Pulse, Sealed)

GI Joe 25th Anniversary Roddy Piper (Iron Grenadier, Exclusive, Sealed)

GI Joe Assault on Cobra Island Box Set (Sealed)

GI Joe Tanks for the Memories (2007 Exclusive, Sealed)

GI Joe Crimson Strike Team (2009 JoeCon Ex, Sealed)

GI Joe Vacation in the Shadows (2010 JoeCon Ex, Sealed)

Zombie Initiative (2014 JoeCon Ex, Sealed)

Tiger Force vs Iron Grenadiers (2015 JoeCon Ex, Sealed)

GI Joe Crimson Guard (2014 Joe Club Exclusive, Sealed)

GI Joe Sgt Slaughter (2010 SDCC Exclusive, Sealed)



 

Power Rangers from the 2000s and have come a long way. The recent increase in quality has caused long-time collectors to shift from buying vintage action figures to the newer versions (causing some originals to drop in value). Some of the newer versions feature die-cast parts, increased articulation, and great sculpts. Some of the more popular characters and accessories can sell for good money on the aftermarket, especially if they are convention exclusives or limited editions. Newer Power Rangers figures have a large fanbase, so selling them online shouldn't be too difficult.


Some of the most valuable Power Ranger action figures from the 2000s and up include:


Mighty Morphin Power Rangers Dragon Dagger (SDCC 2014, Gold, Sealed)

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers White Ranger Saba Dagger (SDCC 2015 Ex, Sealed)

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers Dino Megazord (2013, Sealed)

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers Dragonzord (2014, Sealed)

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers Green Ranger Helmet (2016, Sealed)

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers Black and Gold Megazord (2015, Sealed)

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers Thunder Megazord (2016, Sealed)

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers Saba Talking Sword (2015, Sealed)

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers Green Morpher (SDCC 2013, Gold, Sealed)

Power Rangers Zeo Gold Ranger Communicator (SDCC 2017 Exclusive, Sealed)



 

Imported action figures (Kaiyodo, Yamato, etc) from the 2000s can sometimes have value as they can be a little tougher to find. Some lines are worth more than others as they weren't as widely distributed outside of Japan. Generally, these are figures related to certain anime and video games. These are too broad to provide any kind of reliable value guide. If you need help pricing out a collection of important action figures, please let us know and we can do our best to help.



 

Action figures from the 2000s and up focus more on articulation, sculpting, and quality. That being said, the collector's market for action figures from this period will depend on what toy lines you might have. The higher-end action figures and statues from companies like Sideshow and Hot Toys will have the most value, but those also had the higher retail value when they were originally released.


 

A Guide to Grading Your Action Figure Collection


We will sometimes get asked by customers if it's worth grading their action figure collection, and the answer is usually no. Grading action figures is very expensive and strict. What you normally want to grade is vintage toys, or worth more than a few hundred dollars. If you have a modern figure worth $50-100, then you'll most likely spend more on the grading than the figure is worth. The value won't go up enough to make it worth the price of grading (you might even lose money). That being said, here's a quick rundown of how grading an action figure works.


AFA uses 3 tiers when grading action figures: gold (grade of 85 or better), silver (grade of 75 or better), and bronze (anything lower than 75). Note that when checking for defects, you need to look for small dings to the bubble, creases/bends to the card (also corner dings), scratches to either, and yellowing to the bubble. If a bubble is yellowed, then it will not always deduct from the grade, but you will get a "Y" next to the grade to indicate that the bubble is yellowed.



If you even have a single bend or ding, then the grade might drop considerably. To get in the gold tier the figure and its package need to be considered nearly perfect. Even a small flaw (scratches, tiny corner dings, etc) will drop you into the silver tier. A few bigger creases and dings in the bubble will drop the figure into the bronze tier, which would drop the value considerably. Below is a good example of a crease to the card that drops the grade to the bronze tier (the figure was graded at a 70). Note that old price stickers don't affect the grade of an action figure unless you try to peel it off and damage the card/bubble. Having an unpunched card doesn't help the figure receive a better grade either.



Generally speaking, it's too expensive to grade any newer action figures (grading is also more strict), since the cost would exceed the actual value of most toys. The actions figures that usually get graded are harder-to-find vintage, high-grade, sealed toys from the 1980s (ex: original GI Joe Snake Eyes or Masters of the Universe He-Man). We don't recommend grading any loose action figures unless they are hard-to-find mail-away figures in great condition (cost also isn't any lower).



In regards to the cost of grading a sealed action figure, AFA will charge $90 for their standard, premium grading service for vintage action figures, and $45 for their modern, premium grading service. They don't have the cheaper services open at the moment (that may change soon). Note that these prices are only for smaller-scale action figures. If you want to grade playsets or anything of a larger scale, then the cost will go up considerably. AFA does offer discounts if you sign up for their membership programs. It will cost an extra $20 if you'd like a UV-resistant grading case from AFA.


 

What Are Some of the Best Ways to Sell an Action Figure or Toy Collection?


So you've got a general idea of what your collection is worth and are now looking for a way to sell your action figures or toys. If you've come into an action figure collection and just feel overwhelmed and don't know how to proceed, then we highly recommend getting some advice from professionals on what to do next. If you feel like you have some expensive toys, then we recommend having an appraiser take a look (yes, we give free toy collection appraisals) and get their opinion on the actual value of the item(s). This will also help you verify that you have something legit and not a reproduction or bootleg as those can be very common. If you prefer to do things on your own, then you're in luck, because we have plenty of useful tips here.


What we suggest doing first is to look for a venue to sell your collection. How you sell your toys will depend on your situation. If you need money or space quickly, or just want to wipe your hands clean in one shot, then we suggest trying to sell the entire collection to one buyer. You can look online to find a reliable toy buyer (yes, we buy toy collections). Note that if time isn't an issue, then you have more options when selling your collection.


Let's start by going over the options when selling a loose/opened toy collection. If the collection consists of loose toys, then we suggest buying sandwich bags (bigger ones work best) and putting individual toys and their accessories into each bag. This will help you get organized. You can find out what accessories go with each figure by looking online. It can be tough to figure out where each accessory goes if you're not familiar with the toy line, but here's a tip. If you want information on a particular figure, check for a manufacturer and copyright date. Most figures will have the manufacturer and year listed somewhere on the toy. You can then use that information to look up the toy online to find out more details.


In regards to how to sell the collection after organizing, we suggest taking all the lower-value stuff in putting it in lots. You'll probably do better if you put them into more organized lots, rather than a random assortment. An example of this would be if you have a collection of loose Marvel Legends then it might be easier to sell to put them in lots organized by series. This will allow you to get close to actual value while selling multiple figures with each sale.


If your collection consists of sealed action figures, then you're going to have a much easier time than a collection of opened/loose toys. You just need to take separate pictures and list everything individually on sites such as eBay. Selling sealed figures in lots also works if you have complete sets.



Action figure prices can be researched online, but if you're doing auction-style format, then you just can start everything at a penny and have each auction run 7 days and end on a Sunday at 9 PM EST. Just make sure you're detailed in your title and description. This will allow you to get more and limit returns.


If you've done your research and have prices in mind and want to do buy-it-now style listings, then we suggest trying to keep your prices low which would keep things from sitting around for months or years. If you have figures that are worth some money (ex: $50-100), then selling them individually seems to work well for us, but if you find stuff that isn't worth much (ex: $10-20), then you can selling them in lots works well. If you have anything worth major money (ex: over $2,000), then consider grading the figure and using a consignment shop such as Heritage Auctions.


If you need boxes for shipping, look into getting some from your local post office. If you're using USPS, then they offer free Priority Mailboxes. We like using the shoebox-size boxes for newer, sealed action figures (they can be ordered for free on the USPS website). You can also use the 1095 size Priority Mail boxes for anything that might be wider. Make sure to research shipping rates before selling anything online, as they can be constantly changing.


Auction-style listings on eBay can be great to save time, but sometimes you won't clear as much money when compared to buy-it-now style listings. We recommend auctions only if you're in a rush to get money. If you decide to go with buy-it-now pricing, then we suggest keeping your prices lower than most other sellers to make things go quickly. Also, make sure to price things based on sold prices (not other sellers' asking prices).


You have other options other than selling your toy collection on eBay, consignment shops, or local collection buyers. One of them is to set up at a local comic book convention. We don't like doing this though. We find that you need to bring a vast inventory of toys to conventions to find interested buyers. If you don't have a massive collection and a good way to display them (which is another problem), then you're just better off selling them another way.


Please note that any opinions we give in this article (or any personalized advice we offer) are for entertainment purposes only and you should always do more research before selling a toy collection. We should not be your sole means of research. If you have a collection of action figures or toys your want to sell and just want to cut out the hassle, be sure to give us a call, email, or text and we will make a fair offer on your entire collection. We've been buying and selling toys for many years, and have a great passion for the hobby.


NOTE THAT THIS ARTICLE IS FOR ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES ONLY. DO NOT USE OUR WEBSITE WHEN MAKING ANY FINANCIAL DECISIONS.








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